The tCheck Cannabis Oil Potency Tester: Accurately Dose Your Edibles, Every Time

When I first started cooking with cannabis, I had no idea that it was going to be such a struggle to predict the perfect dosage. I’d make oil using the same method, but everytime I harvested a different strain, my cannabis oil would be stronger or weaker and I had to spend a day or two as a human guinea pig, slowly testing my oil until I knew it was just right.  

Dosing soon became an obsession, and I learned how to guesstimate dosage over time using the method in this post. But doing the research took time and the method was sometimes confusing. I often had to double check my work to get a semi-accurate guess.

Even after all of that math, I would still be in the dark about how strong my oil was going to be. And in the meantime, I still had to guinea pig it up so I didn’t make a recipe too strong or totally ineffective.

While tracking down a strain’s THC content is getting easier all of the time thanks to websites like Wikileaf, you never really know. Sometimes different phenotypes of the same strain, and different growing conditions can affect the THC and overall cannabinoid content. That’s why on sites like Wikileaf, you’ll see that there’s the highest tested rate and the average rate of THC. And sometimes there can be a big gap between the highest and the lowest THC tested for the same strain.

And as a home cook who loves accuracy and sciency things, I wanted to really know how strong my oil was so I could use it instantly in my baked goods, cannabis salves, and weed lube without having to wait all day to test tiny increments and just feel it out to get an effective dose.

As some of you know, I’ve been looking for a home THC test kit that doesn’t require a degree in chemistry or taking out a personal loan and it finally arrived in my mailbox. The tCheck has become an irreplaceable tool in my edibles kitchen and I literally couldn’t accurately bake without it. I tested 5 different cannabis infusions in one day because it was so easy to set up and use over and over. No little parts to lose. No mess, fuss, or confusing results. It’s so simple and accurate that I won’t be left guessing about potency anymore.

I don’t review anything that I don’t love, because it makes me feel like an internet troll, so if it’s on the Wake & Bake blog, you can already guess what I have to say about it… Spoiler alert…  I love this thing.

Using the TCheck: A Home THC Test Kit to Calculate Dosage

tcheck home thc test kitIf you’ve read Wake & Bake, you probably know that I kindaaa like doing things the hard way. If I can find something in my kitchen that does the job, I’m going to use it even if it takes me 10 times as long to finish that job and then I’m going to pat myself on the back for being re-gard-damn-sourceful.

Well, I feel like I must be drawing in things from the universe that make life easier, because after adding the Levo, the Nova and the tCheck to my kitchen, I can go from a big jar of cannabis trim to a table filled with edibles and topicals in a couple of hours. What used to take me and hour of questionable decarb, 8 hours of infusing in a crockpot and at least 8 hours of human guinea pig time, now takes an hour of super accurate decarb, 1-2 hours in the MB and 5 minutes testing the amount of cannabinoids with the TCheck. So, now I can pat myself on the back for being a pro-gard-damn-ductive.home thc test tcheck

When it arrived, the farmer instantly called it the “Pot Game Boy” because it’s a little rectangular device with a simple touch screen that looked kinda like the top part of a Game Boy. Opposed to the Breaking Bad/chemistry set THC testing kits out there, it looked uncomplicated and easy to use. And it was!

  1. You turn it on.
  2. Place the tray in that contains two drops of melted cannabis oil or butter (don’t worry, you’re not wasting it, you can eat it when the test is done 😉  
  3. Push the button of the medium you’re testing (currently coconut oil, butter, and olive oil, but they told me that they’ll have tincture testing available with a software update in a couple of months).
  4. And the results will pop up in a few seconds.

Now… if you’re an American, you’re going to see this confusing unit of measurement… The results will say something like 7.3 mg/ml. And you’ll be all like “whaaaaa the fffff is a ml?” Don’t worry. I’ve got you. There are about 5 ml in a teaspoon (thank you google conversion) and all you have to do is multiply your result by 5 to see how many mg of cannabinoids are in a teaspoon of your oil or butter.

tcheck cannabis test kit

So my first cannabis coconut oil tested at 36.5 mg/teaspoon.

And we’re learning the metric system! Yay!

Since I’m working on a new book (which we’re going to get to in a minute), I’m so excited to be able to test the results of different methods and report back to you guys.

Is it accurate?

The tCheck is accurate within 10% of the reading, so 12mg/ml has an error of 1.2mg/ml. Again, for those of you who (like me) are metrically challenged, that means that your teaspoon of oil could be 6mg weaker or stronger than your test result.

Now, when handing an edible to your friends and family, you can say something like, “This cookie has approximately 25-35mg of cannabinoids in it.” Which is much better than, “I don’t know… one cookie was pretty strong for me. But ??? for you?”

tcheck test kit

Pros

You guys know how this goes. I die for pros and cons lists, so let’s hit it!

  • Ease of use- It’s so very simple. Push a couple of buttons and you know the potency of your oil or butter in less than 2 minutes.
  • Accuracy- At 10%+/-, it’s accurate enough for cannabis home cooks and caregivers.
  • Software/firmware updates- This is my favorite thing about the tCheck. I asked them about whether or not the tCheck could test tinctures, and they said the next softwar update will be in a couple of months and it will include a test for tinctures. So when my next batch of tinctures are done, I can test them with the tCheck. So excited for a device that will continue to become more useful.
  • No easy-to-lose parts or having to buy any other testing supplies- There are only three necessary parts of the tCheck (four if you count the usb charger that is universal). The device itself and the reusable testing slide. Other test kits are disposable, so you can only use them a few times. Plus, they generally test the plant material, so you don’t know what your final oil or tincture has extracted. I love that you can use the tCheck over and over again without ever having to worry about replacing anything or losing little parts.

Cons

  • Not just THC- The tCheck measures total cannabinoids, so you’re not just checking THC content. If you want to break it down further, you’ll have to know your strain and do some extra math. The tCHeck folks are working on integrating a calculator, but for now, you’d have to do that legwork on your own. I love all of the cannabinoids, so knowing how much medicine is in my cookie is good enough for me, but if you only want to know the THC content of your infusions, we’re going to have to hang on until technology catches up.
  • Waiting on an Update- I guess this is the flipside of the thing that I love most about the tCheck. I love that they’re going to update the software so I can test more stuff in the future. But, like that little Varuka Salt in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, I want it nooooooooooowwwwwww. While I’m mostly going to use the device to test my butter and oil, it would be nice to be able to test tinctures right out of the gate. I guess I’ll just have to be patient.
  • Cost- Here we go. I’m sure someone out there is going to reem me for suggesting that a device that costs money is worthwhile. Everytime I get stoked on an innovative cannabis product, someone writes me a troll letter telling me that I’m trying to pull one over on someone I must consider a “stupid stoner”. I don’t think any of you are stupid, and I know for a fact that some of you guys love stuff like this. Some people buy fancy shoes or take long vacations, I’d rather spend my money on cannabis stuff for my kitchen and I know some of you are with me.

So I put this under cons because it costs money. The tCheck retails at $299 and they’ve given me a coupon code for you guys for 15% off (or $45 off) making it $255 bucks for you guys. I literally would have paid that much for someone to tell me how strong my hash butter was before I melted into the floor for several hours after eating too much too soon without doing my dosing math first. I would have paid the same amount to skip all of that cannabis math guesswork for all these years so it wouldn’t have taken so long to find the perfect dose for me. But, maybe that’s just me. I’m sure you’ll let me know.

dsc_0790

There are other devices out there that retail at over $700, like the MyDX Analyzer that does virtually the same thing, but looks like something darth vader would use to test his weed. And while I save my pennies so I can check that one out for you guys and compare the two, I’m going to continue to use the tCheck because being able to test my cannabis at home has already been worth it.

tCheck Coupon Code

While we’re talking about monies… Here’s that coupon code for the tCheck:

Wakeandbake15

It’s for 15% off your order, which equals $45 off the tCheck.

A New Cookbook?!?!?!

Since this is the first thing I’ve written in awhile, and it’ll probably be one of the last things I write for awhile, I wanted to let you know that I’m working on a new book! This means that I won’t be as responsive to emails and comments (there are so many these days because you guys are awesome and curious a.f.), but it’s totally going to be worth it. I’m compiling every oil, tincture, and hash infusion you can think of along with everything I’ve ever seen in dispensaries that made me go, “I waaant.” So this next book is going to be filled with infused hard candies, gummies, lollipops, massage oil, cannacaps, HighQuil (right?), canna soda, chocolate bars, cannabis lip balm (it’s a thing) and so much more. I’m also diving into the science of cannabis and breaking it all down so you can be the hippest and most educated cannabis enthusiast on the block. You’re going to be so cool.

And because I’m an overachiever, I’m also going back to school next month to become a health coach and get my Holistic Medical Cannabis Practitioner certification. That way, I can do more focused one on one work with all of you in the future. And I love you guys, so I’m super excited about that.

But back to the book. I want to hear from you… would you rather get a book called:

DIY-spensary: the ultimate guide to cannabis infusions and dispensary favorites

diy-spensary

Or

Dazed & Infused: the ultimate guide to cannabis infusions and dispensary favorites.

dazed-infused

Let me know in the comments below!

Much love,

Corinne

Summary
tCheck: a home cannabinoid test kit for finding the right dose
Article Name
tCheck: a home cannabinoid test kit for finding the right dose
Description
The tCheck is an affordable and easy way to accurately test the dosage of your edibles at home by detecting the cannabinoids in the your cannabis oil or cannabutter.
Author
Publisher Name
Wake & Bake

Thank you for supporting this site with purchases made through links in this article.

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31 Comments

  • Reply
    Chris Daisy
    November 11, 2016 at 5:57 pm

    Thank you Corinne for this post…”Food for thought”!!

    Wishing you the very best with your new book and going back to school!!

    Regards,
    Chris Daisy

    • Reply
      Char
      November 6, 2017 at 6:30 pm

      DYI

  • Reply
    Paul T Weimer
    November 14, 2016 at 2:36 pm

    Is there any way to get rid of the floating social media bar? It makes the site very difficult to use.

  • Reply
    NancyD
    November 14, 2016 at 5:10 pm

    Thanks for all you do. Love the first title best. I’m very new to medical cannibas and edibles are my (and my doctors) preferred method of medicating. Your book has been invaluable with all your tips and recipes…and you totally crack me up as I read it. Can’t wait for the next book to come out and love the idea of being able to check the dosing of my edible so am excited about the Tcheck too. Do you have an idea when the new book will be released? Happy writing!

    Nancy

  • Reply
    Robin Davis
    November 14, 2016 at 5:16 pm

    Dazed and infused

    I am desperately trying to find measurements of product needed for making bubble hash. I have read dozens of recipes with not even guess-timations on how much to use. Please help.

  • Reply
    Armando
    November 14, 2016 at 6:22 pm

    I like Dazed and Infused for your New book!

  • Reply
    kelly
    November 14, 2016 at 7:19 pm

    Dazed and Infused ! I am so glad I found your site. You rock.

  • Reply
    Sapo
    November 14, 2016 at 8:50 pm

    While “Dazed & Infused” is a more colorful and playful title, I prefer “DIY-spensary” because a) it epitomizes your classic word-smithing brilliance and b) it gives the reader an impression that this is good fun but also a potentially serious endeavor with medical implications.

  • Reply
    Tammy Coulter
    November 15, 2016 at 8:52 am

    Have to agree with the DIY Spensory

  • Reply
    Kris
    November 24, 2016 at 8:54 am

    You are my cannabinoid guru! I love what you say and how you say it!! Thanks for all the insights, equipment reviews, coupons and cookbooks. Always a pleasure! Keep on sharing. We’re out here listening.

  • Reply
    Doc Smiley
    January 7, 2017 at 11:57 am

    “Dazed and Infused”! It’s catchy and you can actually say it out loud. I’m sure there is a way to say the other name, but it is not obvious.

    • Reply
      Corinne
      January 8, 2017 at 4:48 pm

      Hi Doc!

      Thanks for reaching out! I’m starting to feel the exact same way about the title. Trying to explain what DIY is and how to say the name would get really tiring. I only had to explain Wake + Bake to one person 😉

      Much love,
      Corinne

  • Reply
    Cannabis Coconut Oil Recipe and Tutorial | Wake & Bake
    January 21, 2017 at 9:34 am

    […] you don’t have a cannabinoid tester like the tCheck (which I LOVE), you have to test it on yourself and do a little dosage math. When playing the […]

  • Reply
    Cannacaps: Quick & Easy Cannabis Coconut Oil Capsules | Wake & Bake
    January 25, 2017 at 11:32 am

    […] them. I’ve written extensively about my personal accidental cannabis overdoses and now use a tCheck to test my oil before consuming any of my cannabis infused goodies. After testing my oil and making […]

  • Reply
    Decarboxylating Cannabis to Activate THC | Wake & Bake
    January 25, 2017 at 11:39 am

    […] for the right amount of time. Since I don’t have a lab to test in and I didn’t have a tCheck until very recently, I thought that I was really killing it at the decarb game and my edibles were […]

  • Reply
    Laura
    January 30, 2017 at 11:57 pm

    tCheck is sold out, and won’t be shipping for 6-8 weeks. I too am like Varuka Salt, and I want it NOOOOOOOOW!

  • Reply
    Keiran
    February 13, 2017 at 3:48 am

    Definitely option 2 – a great article…I shall start saving for one.

  • Reply
    JK
    February 28, 2017 at 2:36 am

    kay, so I’ve been infusing high end tequila with local organic fruit and high grade cannabis shake…. been wrecking the pot crazy town of Steamboat…. been human guinea pig. got it around 10 grams to the liter, very potent… guessing the product is 25% thc (easily) …. trying to figure out the exact potency per ounce/milliliter…. weed nerds unite! 😀 anyway if you have any insights, much appreciated! JK

  • Reply
    Mitch
    March 29, 2017 at 2:02 pm

    Corinna,
    Stumbled across your blog about two weeks ago; first and foremost, a big thank you. You do a great job at getting the essential knowledge out there while minimizing the potential to misunderstand it. I was thinking about the t-check, and it got me wondering. Given the wide amount of contaminants that can alter the color of an oil or tincture regardless of actual cannabinoid content, I’m having a hard time grasping how this can provide any solid degree of accuracy. I would think that processing methods that could greatly change something as simple as chlorophyll content would alter the results of this device, without having any impact on concentrations of the chemicals you’re actually testing for. Do you have any insight on the matter?

    • Reply
      Corinne
      April 24, 2017 at 2:04 pm

      Hey Mitch!

      Sorry for the delay, but I really wanted to get a great answer for you on this one. So I asked and got this answer from the tCheck founder: “There are definitely contaminants that may affect the readings. However, in general, these are not used in the cultivation our processing of cannabis. tCheck does not use visible light to perform the measurements, but rather we use uv light. At those wavelengths, the stuff that you can see that turns the oil green is actually completely transparent. Cannabinoids, in the other hand, have a very strong absorbing response to certain wavelengths of uv light. This is why people making infusions at home cannot visibly tell the strength of the infusions.” I hope that helps! Much love, Corinne

      • Reply
        Mitch
        April 24, 2017 at 3:21 pm

        Corinne,
        thanks so much for taking the time to research that. I initially tried reaching out to them directly, but still have yet to hear back. This will most definitely be the next piece of tech I add to the collection.

    • Reply
      KingKola1
      May 10, 2017 at 4:07 pm

      With a small fortune invested in HPLC testing of infused oil samples through SCLabs on-hand, I was prepared to evaluate my tCheck device when it arrived. I eagerly looked forward to writing a shining review, backed with solid data, about this novel device that could perform economical home testing of infusions.

      When the device arrived, I ran well over 60 tests as part of a Gage Reproducibility and Repeatability study. The results of the Gage R&R were about 30% of tolerance using an arbitrary, loosely set tolerance of ±0.5 mg/ml. The tCheck full scale range only goes up to 10.0 mg/ml so ±0.5 is very generous. A Gage R&R result of 30% would be just okay for a home tester I suppose, but not great. Industry standards for Gage R&R state that less than 10% is good; 10% to 30% needs work; over 30% is not acceptable.

      However, the accuracy of the tCheck is not close to being acceptable. The best results I could get were more than 400% lower than the HPLC test from SCLabs in Santa Cruz, CA which is not close by any stretch of the imagination. Someone could just guess at the value and be closer. I discussed the issue with tCheck over the phone and via email; they were very professional in how they handled my issue and went the extra mile to help me. I ended up sending my tCheck back twice and each time it came back “no-trouble-found”. I used unfiltered and then filtered coconut oil , coconut MCT oil, and Ghee butter ; some of my oils were infused in the oven with no water used, others were infused in simmering water, and others in a crockpot. The appearance of the infused products looked quite different depending on how they were infused. Everything was strained through cheese cloth and as clean and pure as I could make them in the kitchen (no lab filters…). The test results were similar for all samples; more than 400% low. For what it is worth, tCheck suggests the use of filtered coconut oils, coconut MCT oils (which freezes at an inconvenient 27°F), and Ghee butters; using these base materials reduces the number of particles that the light must shine through. When cooking healing salves or chocolate, and computing the dose using data from SCLabs, the effects were right on the mark compared to the effects of commercial products, which gives me even more confidence in the SCLabs test results over the tCheck results. By the way, SCLabs is in the process of becoming ISO 17025 and ISO 170743 certified.

      I REALLY did want to see this device perform well. I intended to verify the tCheck accuracy and Gage R&R and then be able to confidently test my products with the convenience, and lower cost that the system could have theoretically provided. Unfortunately, I have had to return my unit a third time, this time for a refund. My strategy must now revert back to doing larger batches and have the samples tested at SCLabs. If I learn tCheck somehow improved their device, I would like to try it out again. For now, this evaluation was costly to me and turned out to be a complete let down.

      If you are not aware of the Gage R&R, it is statistical calculation (requiring a computer) based of many measurements of the same thing by different people. The results provide a measure of the variation in the measurement system arising from the measurement from the tCheck device and the people taking the measurement. It is different than a “simple” level of accuracy.

      To contact tCheck, I would suggest logging on to their site and starting with an email stating the issue and a phone number where you can be reached. If they can not answer you via email, they will probably give you a call. That has been my experience anyway. They do not publish a phone number for technical support that I am aware of.

      tCheck will tell you their accuracy is right on, based on repeated comparison tests from independent labs. However, there is a huge disconnect between the data they are collecting and my data – I really wish someone could prove me wrong because I really want it to work.

      I am not up on their technology 100%, but I believe that they pass a UV light through the test sample and make a determination of the mg/ml levels based on an evaluation of light spectrum and intensity that passes through the test sample. I would think a measurement like that would be very difficult to accomplish with the high level of variation in plant materials, variations in impurities added to the base oil/butter, and individual infusion techniques.

    • Reply
      KingKola1
      May 10, 2017 at 4:41 pm

      With a small fortune invested in HPLC testing of infused oil samples through SCLabs on-hand, I was prepared to evaluate my tCheck device when it arrives. I eagerly looked forward to writing a shining review, backed with solid data, about this novel device that could perform economical home testing of infusions.

      When the device arrived, I ran well over 60 tests as part of a Gage Reproducibility and Repeatability study. The results of the Gage R&R were about 30% of tolerance using an arbitrary, loosely set tolerance of ±0.5 mg/ml. The tCheck full scale range only goes up to 10.0 mg/ml so ±0.5 was very generous. A Gage R&R result of 30% would be just okay for a home tester I suppose, but not great. Industry standards for Gage R&R state that less than 10% is good; 10% to 30% needs work; over 30% is not acceptable.

      However, the accuracy of the tCheck is not close to being acceptable. The best results were more than 400% lower than the HPLC test from SCLabs in Santa Cruz, CA which is not close by any stretch of the imagination. Someone could just guess at the value and be closer. I discussed the issue with tCheck over the phone and via email; they were very professional in how they handled my issue and went the extra mile to help me. I ended up sending my tCheck back twice and each time it came back “no-trouble-found”. I used unfiltered and then filtered coconut oil per their recommendation, coconut MCT oil, and Ghee butter, some of my oils were infused in the oven with no water used, others were infused in simmering water, and others in crockpots. Everything was strained through cheese cloth. The appearance of the infused product looks different in color and transparency by the naked eye. The test results were similar for all samples; more than 400% low. For what it is worth, tCheck suggests the use of filtered coconut oils, coconut MCT oils (which freezes at an inconvenient 27°F), and Ghee butters; using these base materials reduces the number of particles that the light must shine through. When cooking healing salves or chocolate, and computing the dose using data from SCLabs, the effects were right on the mark compared to the effects of commercial products, which gives me even more confidence in the SCLabs test results over the tCheck results. By the way, SCLabs is in the processing of becoming ISO 17025 and ISO 170743 certified.

      I REALLY did want to see this device perform well. I intended to verify the tCheck accuracy and Gage R&R and then be able to confidently test my products with the convenience, and lower cost that the system could have theoretically provided. Unfortunately, I have had to return my unit a third time, this time for a refund. My strategy must now revert back to doing larger batches and have the samples tested at SCLabs. If I learn tCheck somehow improved their device, I would like to try it out again. For now, this evaluation was costly to me in time and money, and turned out to be a complete let down.

      Oh for those not aware, the Gage R&R is statistical calculation that requires a computer. The results are based of many measurements of the same thing by different people. The results measure the variation in the measurement system arising from the actual measurement of the tCheck device and the people taking the measurement. It is different than a “simple” accuracy level.

      To contact them, I would suggest logging on to their site and starting with an email stating the issue and a phone number where you can be reached. If they can not answer you via email, they will probably give you a call. That has been my experience anyway. They do not publish a phone number for technical support that I am aware of.

      tCheck will tell you their accuracy is “right on” based on repeated comparison tests from independent labs. However, there is a huge disconnect between the data they are collecting and my data. I think they are working to get to the bottom of this now.

      Though I am not up on the tCheck technology 100% but I believe that they pass a UV light through the test sample and make a determination of the mg/ml levels based on the measurement of light spectrum and intensity that passes through the test sample. I would think a measurement like that would be very difficult to accomplish with the high level of variation in plant material, variations in impurities inadvertently added to the base oil/butter, and variations in individual infusion techniques.

      • Reply
        KingKola1
        May 23, 2017 at 11:59 am

        Woops, sorry for the double review of tCheck on your site. I did not know if my first review went through. Please feel free to remove one to clean up your site.

  • Reply
    Vicki
    April 10, 2017 at 7:03 pm

    you have not steered me wrong yet – Magical Butter machine – LOVE, Ardent decarb – ADORE – this one will totally be on my list
    thanks hotness, love ya work
    xx

  • Reply
    Julie Hansen
    April 26, 2017 at 9:30 am

    Bless you and all you do! I ordered your book and can’t wait!
    In Light-Julie

  • Reply
    Pam Revell-Wright
    May 11, 2017 at 1:25 pm

    Can’t afford the tcheck at this time…but can relate to how easy it is to take to much of your 1st batch of oil…I was worthless for an entire day. I now know for certainty that 1/2 tsp was toooooo much. I will now search for my dab, smidgeon, etc. measuring spoon set.

  • Reply
    leo
    June 16, 2017 at 5:56 pm

    btw ml=gram, or is that way too cryptic a measurement? i never managed to measure my food by the spoonfull lol

  • Reply
    Dennis
    June 21, 2017 at 7:15 am

    Dazed and Infused LOL. I just love your site. I am also an internet marketer in the Cannabis Niche. Your site was wonderful and I am going to be following you and using the recipe’s. I have just started making my own fudge and brownies from my own butter. I am still learning hehe.
    Can’t wait to share this site with the chef, my wife.
    thanks again and keep sharing the great info
    Dennis

  • Reply
    Cearsha
    September 29, 2017 at 2:49 pm

    Dazed and Infused – love it! Enjoying learning to make simple infused edibles. Also I’m just a sucker for a new cookbook!!

    • Reply
      Kristina Etter
      October 20, 2017 at 11:40 am

      Great! Thanks for following along!

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